Congratulations to FRANCE for winning the World Cup!

France has just won the Football World Cup for the second time in history. After they won before in 1998, tonight they took the cup after an exciting final in Moscow. We are sure that the party has started in Paris and everywhere else in the country! We would like to say congratulations!

If you want to know more about the Eurovision Song Contest, visit https://eurovision.tv

Horizons mission – Soyuz: launch to orbit

This unique video shows a full launch of the Soyuz MS-09: from liftoff to orbit.

Watch the launch from inside the crew capsule with first-ever shots from outside the spacecraft recorded by cameras fixed to the exterior of the Soyuz.

The intense launch lasts less than ten minutes whereby the Soyuz spacecraft is propelled 1640 km and gains 210 km altitude. Every second for nine minutes, the spacecraft accelerates 50 km/h on average as the rocket’s boosters burn their fuel and are discarded.
See the astronaut’s reactions and what the spacecraft looks like as the main steps are carried out to get into orbit:

-00:12 Launch command issued
-00:10 Engine turbopumps at flight speed
-00:05 Engines at maximum thrust
00:00 Launch
+1:54 Separation of emergency rescue system
+1:57 First stage separation
+2:38 Fairing separation
+4:48 Second stage separation
+4:58 Tail adapter separation
+8:45 Third stage engine cut off having arrived in orbit
+8:49 Soyuz separation, deploy solar arrays and antennae

The astronauts, from left to right, are NASA astronaut Serena Auñón-Chancellor, Roscosmos commander Sergei Prokopyev and ESA astronaut and flight engineer Alexander Gerst launched in the Soyuz MS-09 spacecraft from the Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan to the International Space Station on 6 June 2018. ESA astronaut Matthias Maurer and ESA television host Richard Hollingham provide commentary taken from the live event.

Hunched in their Sokol flight suits that offer protection in case of fire or depressurisation, the trio stay in the crew capsule of the Soyuz – the only module that is also designed to survive a return to Earth. The bags above their heads contain supplies for the International Space Station as every bit of space is used.

During a Soyuz launch astronauts typically experience forces of up to 4g – having to work while being pressed into their seats with a force that is four times more than the gravity felt on Earth. The Soyuz commander uses a stick to press buttons as they are too far away from the control panel.

The fluffy toys above the astronauts’ heads are mascots and good luck charms but also serve as a simple but effective test to see when the spacecraft is in orbit: when they start to float the spacecraft is weightless and orbiting Earth. Above Sergei is the mascot for the 2018 FIFA soccer World Cup held in Russia. Alexander took German children television icon “Die Maus” with him.

The launch went as planned as the 50-m tall Soyuz rocket propelled the astronauts to their cruising speed of around 28 800 km/h.
For this launch the astronauts took 34 orbits of Earth over two days to arrive at their destination spending their time in the cramped orbital module of the Soyuz that is no larger than a car. With limited communications and living space the astronauts had time to adapt to weightlessness and reflect on their mission ahead. They aligned their spacecraft with the International Space Station and approached the orbital outpost for docking on 8 June 2018. The files for this video were downloaded by the astronauts after arriving at the Space Station.

Alexander is a returning visitor to the International Space Station, the first of ESA’s 2009 class of astronauts to be sent into space for a second time. During the second part of his mission Alexander will take over as commander of the International Space Station, only the second time an ESA astronaut will take on this role so far.

Credits: ESA / NASA / Roscosmos

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Armchair Fan – Simon’s Cat | SHORTS

Simon’s plan to watch the Fifa World Cup 2018 is ruined by his four legged armchair fan.
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‘Armchair Fan’ Credits:
Directed by: Simon Tofield
Animation: Jimeno Farfan
Animation Supervisor: Rachel Thorn
Design & Rigging: Trevor Phillips
Art Director: Liza Nechaeva
Voices: Simon Tofield
Music & Foley: Shrooty
Voice Record: Chris Swaine @ Fonic
Production Coordinator: Cathryn Gamble
Associate Producer: Edwin Eckford
Producer: Emma Burch

Love Simon’s Cat? Watch our 12 minute colour film ‘Off to the Vet’ – https://youtu.be/GTUruS-lnEo
Think you prefer our work in B&W – See Off to the Vet in B&W HERE – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CyYYH…

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Want to see more of our Black & White films?
Check out our play list here: http://www.goo.gl/FkqgHw

Want to know more about the history of Simon’s Cat?
Watch the Simon’s Cat Story here – http://goo.gl/Vfx2JS

FAQs:

Q. What software do you use?
A. Simon’s Cat has been made using a variety of animation software over the years. Originally in Adobe Flash. Then TV Paint (and still on occasions) and most recently using CelAction.

Q. Why does it take so long to make each Simon’s Cat film?
A. Animation is a slow process and Simon’s Cat films pay particular attention to observed, real life cat behaviour. Historically the films were traditionally animated frame by frame. More recently we use Celaction which has sped up the process but still requires a lot of care and attention. Each film takes approximately 6-9 weeks to make, depending on complexity, number of characters and special effects.

Horizons mission – First call from space

ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst spoke to European media from the International Space Station on 12 June 2018, just three days after docking with the orbiting outpost.

The press conference was held at the European Astronaut Centre in Cologne, Germany, and was mainly in German.

Alexander answered questions on climate, how it feel to be in space a second time, and the football World Cup.

This is Alexander’s second six-month stay on the International Space Station. The mission is called Horizons as a symbol for the unknown and what lies beyond. The mission further cements ESA’s know-how for living and working off-planet. Alexander will be testing ways of operating and working with robots to develop techniques required for further human and robotic exploration of our Solar System such as commanding rovers while orbiting another planet.

The Horizons science programme is packed with European research: Alexander will take part in over 50 experiments to deliver benefits to people on Earth as well as prepare for future space exploration. Many of these experiments will take place in Europe’s Columbus laboratory that is celebrating its 10th anniversary in space this year.

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Follow Alexander and the Horizons mission on social media via http://bit.ly/AlexanderGerstESA and on http://bit.ly/HorizonsBlogESA.