Ask a space weather researcher | Part 2

On the sidelines at European Space Weather Week 2018, in Leuven, Belgium, ESA Web TV caught up with three scientists taking part in this gathering, Europe’s foremost event focussed how our Sun affects our planet through the phenomenon known as space weather.

We spoke with Dr Petra Vanlommel, a science communicator at the Royal Observatory’s Solar-Terrestrial Centre of Excellence in Brussels, Dr Lucilla Alfonsi, a scientist at Rome’s National Institute of Geophysics and Volcanology, and Ellen Clarke, a geomagnetism researcher at the British Geological Survey in Edinburgh.

Each guest provided a short but enlightening answer to a single question related to their field of research, and we asked:

– What is space weather?
– How does space weather affect modern navigation by satellite?
– What was the famous 1859 Carrington Event?

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ESA is Europe’s gateway to space. Our mission is to shape the development of Europe’s space capability and ensure that investment in space continues to deliver benefits to the citizens of Europe and the world. Check out http://www.esa.int/ESA to get up to speed on everything space related.

Copyright information about our videos is available here: http://www.esa.int/spaceinvideos/Terms_and_Conditions

Ask a space weather researcher | Part 1

On the sidelines at European Space Weather Week 2018, in Leuven, Belgium, ESA Web TV caught up with three scientists taking part in this gathering, Europe’s foremost event focussed how our Sun affects our planet through the phenomenon known as space weather.

We spoke with Alexi Glover, ESA’s Space Weather Service Network Manager, Jesse Andries, a scientist at the Royal Observatory of Belgium in Brussels, and Kirsti Kauristie, a researcher and group leader at the Finnish Meteorological Institute in Helsinki.

Each guest provided a short but enlightening answer to a single question related to their field of research, and we asked:

– How does Europe manage and distribute space weather data?
– What do we observe when we study the Sun?
– What are the northern lights?

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Check out our full video catalog: http://bit.ly/SpaceInVideos
Follow ESA on Twitter: http://bit.ly/ESAonTwitter
On Facebook: http://bit.ly/ESAonFacebook
On Instagram: http://bit.ly/ESAonInstagram
On Flickr: http://bit.ly/ESAonFlickr

ESA is Europe’s gateway to space. Our mission is to shape the development of Europe’s space capability and ensure that investment in space continues to deliver benefits to the citizens of Europe and the world. Check out http://www.esa.int/ESA to get up to speed on everything space related.

Copyright information about our videos is available here: http://www.esa.int/spaceinvideos/Terms_and_Conditions

Asking the big questions: What is space weather?

On the sidelines at European Space Weather Week 2018, in Leuven, Belgium, ESA Web TV caught up with two experts working on the fascinating science of how our Sun’s raging activity affects Earth and, ultimately, the infrastructure, networks and satellites on which we rely for daily economic activity.

We spoke with Dr Manuela Temmer, a heliophysicist working at the Institute of Physics, University of Graz, Austria, and Dr Richard Horne, a senior scientist at the British Antarctic Survey, Cambridge, UK.

Manuela studies solar and heliospheric physics focusing on flares, coronal mass ejections and their space weather impact, while Richard is working on ways to help protect satellites from space weather.

More about space weather:
https://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Operations/Space_Situational_Awareness/Space_weather_and_its_hazards

ESA’s future Lagrange mission to monitor the Sun

Space weather describes the changing environment throughout the Solar System, driven by the energetic and unpredictable nature of our Sun. Solar wind, solar flares and Coronal Mass Ejections can result in geomagetic storms on Earth, potentially damaging satellites in space and the technologies that rely on them, as well as infrastructure on the ground.

ESA’s future Lagrange mission will keep constant watch on the Sun. The satellite, located at the fifth Lagrange point, will send early warning of potentially harmful solar activity before it affects satellites in orbit or power grids on the ground, giving operators the time to act to protect vital infrastructure.

ESA is now working with European industry to assess options for the spacecraft and its mission, with initial proposals expected early in 2020.

What is space weather?

Our star dominates the environment within our Solar System. Unpredictable and temperamental, the Sun has made life on the inner-most planets impossible, due to the intense radiation and colossal amounts of energetic material it blasts in every direction, creating the ever-changing conditions in space known as ‘space weather’.

More about space weather:
http://www.esa.int/spaceweather

Where no mission has gone before

Juha-Pekka Luntama explains why ESA is planning a new Sun-watching satellite that will orbit at a virtual point in space known as L5, the first mission to do so.

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