Good evening, Kraftwerk / Guten Abend Kraftwerk, guten Abend Stuttgart!

On 20 July 2018 around 21:50 local time, ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst welcomed the legendary electronic band Kraftwerk and 7500 visitors to the Jazz Open Festival on Stuttgart’s Schlossplatz – live from the International Space Station, where he will live and work until mid-December 2018. During the call with space, Kraftwerk founding member Ralf Hütter and Alexander played a special duet version of the track Spacelab, for which Alexander had a tablet computer configured with virtual synthesizers on board. With thanks to Kraftwerk for sharing this video footage.

Copyright: Kraftwerk/ESA/JazzOpen – Sitara Schmitz

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So begrüßte ESA-Astronaut Alexander Gerst am 20. Juli 2018 um 21:50 Uhr Ortszeit die legendären Elektro-Pioniere Kraftwerk sowie 7500 Besucherinnen und Besucher des Jazz Open-Festivals auf dem Stuttgarter Schlossplatz – und zwar live von der Internationalen Raumstation ISS, auf der er noch bis Mitte Dezember 2018 lebt und arbeitet.

Kraftwerk-Gründungsmitglied Ralf Hütter und Alexander Gerst spielten eine spezielle Version des Tracks Spacelab im Duett an, für das Gerst eigens einen mit virtuellen Synthesizern konfigurierten Tablet-Computer an Bord hatte.

GUÉRIR DES MALADIES GRÂCE AU CANNABIS ? Vrai ou Faux #77

Pour le prochain épisode, dis moi un truc vrai ou faux sur “la chaleur” dans les commentaires !
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Merci à Eléa Héberlé pour la relecture
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Aide à l’écriture / Montage : Pikup (sa chaîne)
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A très bientôt pour la prochaine vidéo !

Merci à tous et à bientôt ! 😉

Horizons science – perceiving time in space

It often seems like the weekend is over in a heartbeat, while a working week can last forever. ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst explains how he is working with researchers to understand factors influencing time perception on board the International Space Station to help us up in space and on Earth.

As part of the Time experiment, Alexander wears a headset to block out any external visual cues and performs a series of computer prompted tasks designed to test his time perception. These include reproducing the length of a given event, estimating the amount of time elapsed, reacting to stimuli and judging the length of a minute. These results are compared to tests conducted on ground, as researchers gain a clearer picture of how and why perception is affected.

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J’AI TROUVÉ DE LA VIE DANS L’EAU DE CETTE GÉODE ?!

Bon, l’expérience la plus cool de la chaîne, hâte de tester le deuxième protocole !

Un petit pouce en l’air ? (love)

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Shaking Orion’s solar wings

Testing the solar wings of the European service module that will provide power, water, air and electricity to NASA’s Orion Moon module.

The solar arrays Orion will use to produce electricity are tested at ESA’s technical heart in the Netherlands. Folded for launch, the fragile solar panels need to survive the rumbling into space aboard the most powerful rocket ever built, NASA’s Space Launch System.
Orion’s solar panels will be folded inside the rocket fairing on the first leg of the trip around the Moon. Once released from the rocket they will unfold and rotate towards the Sun to start delivering power.
To make sure the solar panels will work after the intense launch, ESA engineers are putting them through rigorous tests that exceed what they will experience on launch day. This includes vibrating them on a shaking table and placing them in front of enormous speakers that recreate the harsh launch conditions.

Orion will eventually fly beyond the Moon with astronauts, the first time a spacecraft will support humans with European hardware will also be the farthest humans ever travel from Earth. The first mission – without astronauts – is getting ready for launch in 2019.

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The legacy of Planck

Operating between 2009 and 2013, ESA’s Planck mission scanned the sky at microwave wavelengths to observe the cosmic microwave background, or CMB, which is the most ancient light emitted in the history of our Universe. Data from Planck have revealed an ‘almost perfect Universe’: the standard model description of a cosmos containing ordinary matter, cold dark matter and dark energy, populated by structures that had been seeded during an early phase of inflationary expansion, is largely correct, but a few details to puzzle over remain. In other words: the best of both worlds.

Credit: ESA/Planck Collaboration

Learn more: http://bit.ly/ESAplanck

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First hot firing of P120C motor for Vega-C and Ariane 6

The hot firing of the development model of the P120C solid fuel rocket motor at Europe’s Spaceport in French Guiana on 16 July 2018, proves the design for use on Vega-C next year and on Ariane 6 from 2020.

The P120C is 13.5 m long and 3.4 m in diameter, and uses solid fuel in a case made of carbon composite material built in a single segment.

It will replace the current P80 as the first stage motor of Vega-C. Two or four P120Cs will be strapped onto Ariane 6 as boosters for liftoff.

This test was a collaboration between ESA, France’s CNES space agency, and Europropulsion under contract to Avio and ArianeGroup.

Learn more: http://bit.ly/HotFiringProvesSolidRocketMotorForAriane6AndVegaC

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Horizons mission time-lapse – from USA to Africa

14 000 kilometres in under 4 minutes!

Join ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst for a quick flight from the USA to Africa aboard the International Space Station in this time-lapse filmed 12.5 times faster than actual speed.

Alexander is living and working on board the International Space Station for six months from June to December 2018.

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Meteorites and us

Humans have always been fascinated by meteorites – solid pieces of debris from comets, asteroids or meteoroids that originate from outer space and survive their passage through the atmosphere, landing on Earth’s surface.

In this video Sean Blair talks about our relationship with these alien rocks – who has them? Why do they have them? How do they look after them?

Find out in the video originally created as part of ESA’s joint, live webcast with ESO for Asteroid Day 2018. Watch it here: https://youtu.be/rZv4wQsOMuA

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Space Bites: Resources beyond Earth | Angel Abbud Madrid

Humans will have to breath, drink and eat while living on the Moon. They will need energy to perform tasks using their robotic companions and materials to build structures. For a sustainable approach to space exploration these resources cannot be carried from Earth but have to be found on the Moon itself.

Angel Abbud Madrid is the Director of the Center for Space Resources at the Colorado School of Mines (CSM), where he leads a multidisciplinary research programme on the human and robotic exploration of space and the utilisation of its resources. He is also the Director of the CSM Space Resources Program, the first academic programme in the world focused on educating scientists, engineers, economists, entrepreneurs and policymakers in the developing field of space resources. 

Space Bites hosts the best talks on space exploration from the most inspiring and knowledgeable speakers from the field. Held at the technical heart of the European Space Agency in the Netherlands, the lectures are now also available on YouTube. If you want to know about the present and future challenges of ESA, stay tuned for more.

To know more about the exploration of the Moon visit http://lunarexploration.esa.int

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