MetOp-C triplets in orbit

MetOp-A was launched in 2006 and MetOp-B in 2012, and now it is time for MetOp-C. This latest polar-orbiting weather satellite will soon liftoff from Europe’s Spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana. Launching sequentially ensures continuous observations of a host of atmospheric variables such as temperature, humidity, trace gases, ozone and wind speed over the ocean. These data are used largely for numerical weather prediction –the basis for weather forecasting.

While it was envisaged that each successive satellite would take over from its predecessor, thanks to the extraordinary quality of these satellites, both MetOp-A and MetOp-B are still going strong.

With MetOp-C, the mission continues as a three-satellite constellation, increasing the wealth of data for weather forecasting. The MetOp programme is thanks to a collaborative undertaking between ESA and Eumetsat. The programme is also Europe’s contribution to a cooperative venture with the US NOAA agency.

More about MetOp-C:
https://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Observing_the_Earth/MetOp

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Getting ready for MetOp-C

The third in the series of MetOp satellites is scheduled for launch on 7 November from Europe’s spaceport in Kourou. In this special edition of Earth from Space, ESA’s MetOp-C project manager, Stéfane Carlier, talks about this latest polar-orbiting weather satellite and how its range of instruments provide data on a host of atmospheric variables such as temperature and humidity. These data are used largely for numerical weather prediction – the basis for weather forecasting. They also contribute to climate research. 

The MetOp programme is a joint undertaking between ESA and the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites, Eumetsat.

The programme is also Europe’s contribution to a cooperative venture with the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, NOAA. The satellites work in conjunction with the NOAA satellite system.

Not only do the MetOp and NOAA satellites fly in complementary orbits to offer maximum coverage, some of the instruments are common to both missions.

More about MetOp-C:
https://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Observing_the_Earth/MetOp

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ESA is Europe’s gateway to space. Our mission is to shape the development of Europe’s space capability and ensure that investment in space continues to deliver benefits to the citizens of Europe and the world. Check out http://www.esa.int/ESA to get up to speed on everything space related.

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SOYOUZ – LE DESCENDANT DE GAGARINE

Abonnez-vous! https://www.youtube.com/StardustLaChaine?sub_confirmation=1

TOUS LES MOYENS DE SOUTENIR LA CHAINE (UTip, Tipeee…) : https://soutenir.stardustcommunity.ga/

Partie 1 d’Arnaud :
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Vidéo de Space Oddity :
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Sources et liens additionnels :
http://www.spacefacts.de/english/flights.htm
https://amzn.to/2OpOf8j
https://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Human_Spaceflight/Research/Soyuz_rocket_fails_on_launch_from_Plesetsk_cosmodrome_carrying_ESA_experiment_payload
https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-16317099
https://spaceflightnow.com/2017/11/30/guidance-error-reportedly-led-to-russian-launch-failure/

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Twitter : https://twitter.com/AstroVicnet
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Caméra :
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Objectif 2 :
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Micro 1 :
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Micro 2 :
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Enregistreur audio :
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Quelques maquettes dans mon décor :

Saturn V :
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Petite Ariane V :
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Livres :

Seul Sur Mars :
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Tintin :
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Tim Peake :
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Expanding Universe :
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Ici la base de la tranquilité :
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COSMOS :
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Histoire de la Conquête Spatiale :
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DVD

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Histoire de l’aviation :
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Les Chevaliers du Ciel :
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Patchs :

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Apollo 17 :
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Columbia :
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BepiColombo mission to Mercury

BepiColombo is scheduled for launch at 01:45 GMT (03:45 CEST) on 20 October on an Ariane 5 from Europe’s Spaceport in Kourou.

Final assembly of the two orbiters and transfer module has taken place, ready for the spacecraft to be integrated into its Ariane 5 launcher.

BepiColombo is Europe’s first mission to Mercury, the smallest and least explored planet in the inner Solar System. It is a joint endeavour between ESA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, JAXA, and consists of two scientific orbiters: ESA’s Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO) and JAXA’s Mercury Magnetospheric Orbiter (MMO). The mission will study all aspects of Mercury, from the structure and dynamics of its magnetosphere and how it interacts with the solar wind, to its internal structure with its large iron core, and the origin of the planet’s magnetic field.

More about #BepiColombo: http://bit.ly/ESAsBepiColombo

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Ariane 6 launch table moved to pad

The 700 tonne steel table that will support Ariane 6 at liftoff was transferred to the pad at Europe’s Spaceport in French Guiana on 10 September 2018.

It is so large that it arrived in parts by ship in February and was then welded together and fitted with equipment at a preparation area 250 m from the launch pad. Moving this giant 4 m high, 20 m long and 18 m wide table to its permanent position on the centre of the pad is complex.

Four hydraulic jacks lifted the table then two trollies moved the table to the edge of the launch pad. A temporary railway and a mechanical guidance system helped roll the table into position over the centre of the pad where it will be lowered with millimeter precision into its final position.

Further mechanical, fluidic and electrical equipment will be installed inside and outside the table.

Credits: ESA/CNES 2018

Learn more about #Ariane6: http://ariane6.esa.int/

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ESA is Europe’s gateway to space. Our mission is to shape the development of Europe’s space capability and ensure that investment in space continues to deliver benefits to the citizens of Europe and the world. Check out http://www.esa.int/ESA to get up to speed on everything space related.

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Aeolus quick steps to launch

This time-lapse video shows ESA’s #Aeolus satellite being prepared for liftoff. It includes shots from the cleanroom in France, its arrival by ship in French Guiana, preparations at Europe’s Spaceport in Kourou, roll out to the launch pad and, finally, liftoff on a Vega rocket on 22 August 2018.

Aeolus carries one of the most sophisticated instruments ever to be put into orbit. The first of its kind, the Aladin instrument includes revolutionary laser technology to generate pulses of ultraviolet light that are beamed down into the atmosphere to profile the world’s winds – a completely new approach to measuring the wind from space.

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ESA is Europe’s gateway to space. Our mission is to shape the development of Europe’s space capability and ensure that investment in space continues to deliver benefits to the citizens of Europe and the world. Check out http://www.esa.int/ESA to get up to speed on everything space related.

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Credits of this video: Directed and realised by Stephane Corvaja, ESA; Realised and edited by Manuel Pédoussaut, Zetapress; Music by Hubrid – GALACTIC

Aeolus highlights

Lofted into orbit on a Vega rocket from Europe’s Spaceport in French Guiana on 22 August 2018, ESA’s Aeolus satellite will measure winds around the globe and play a key role in our quest to better understand the workings of our atmosphere. Importantly, this novel mission will also improve weather forecasting. The Aeolus carries one of the most sophisticated instruments ever to be put into orbit. The first of its kind, Aladin includes revolutionary laser technology to generate pulses of ultraviolet light that are beamed down into the atmosphere to profile the world’s winds – a completely new approach to measuring the wind from space.

Prior to liftoff, the satellite had been at the spaceport for around six weeks being tested, fuelled, encased in the Vega rocket fairing, rolled out to the launch pad and hoisted into the launch tower. Vega lifted off at 21:20 GMT (23:20 CEST, 18:20 local time) on 22 August. Some 55 minutes later, the upper stage delivered Aeolus into orbit and contact was established through the Troll ground station in Antarctica at 00:30 CEST on 23 August. The satellite is being controlled from ESA’s European Space Operations Centre in Darmstadt, Germany. Controllers will spend the next few months carefully checking and calibrating the mission as part of its commissioning phase.

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Aeolus liftoff replay

ESA’s Earth Explorer Aeolus satellite lifted off on a Vega rocket from Europe’s Spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana, at 21:20 GMT (23:20 CEST, 18:20 local time) on 22 August 2018. Aeolus carries one of the most sophisticated instruments ever to be put into orbit. The first of its kind, the Aladin instrument includes revolutionary laser technology to generate pulses of ultraviolet light that are beamed down into the atmosphere to profile the world’s winds – a completely new approach to measuring the wind from space. By profiling the lowermost 30 km of the atmosphere, Aeolus will give scientists global information on the speed of the wind in near-real time. This will improve our understanding of how wind, pressure, temperature and humidity are interlinked. This new mission will also provide insight into how the wind influences the exchange of heat and moisture between Earth’s surface and the atmosphere. These aspects are important for understanding climate change. As well as advancing science and improving weather forecasts, data from Aeolus will be used in air-quality models to improve forecasts of dust and other airborne particles that affect public health.

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Aeolus: of weather and winds

Thanks to the wind, heat is distributed around the planet. Equatorial regions receive more heat from the Sun than other parts of the world. This leads to differences in air temperature, density and pressure, which in turn, cause the air to move – creating wind. This movement of air constitutes the general circulation of the atmosphere, transporting heat away from equatorial regions towards the poles, and returning cooler air to the tropics. The wind clearly plays an important role in weather forecasts, which in turn are not only important for planning our daily affairs, but vital for numerous commercial activities such as farming, fishing, transport, and for taking appropriate measures when extreme weather is on the horizon. Although weather forecasts have advanced considerably in recent years, there is a need for global wind measurements to improve them even further. ESA’s Aeolus mission will fill this gap by providing global wind-profiles in near-real time. The European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts will process these data and the data in their numerical weather prediction models, which will lead to better forecasting.

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Aeolus: preparing for launch

ESA’s Martin Kaspers joins us at Europe’s Spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana, where Aeolus is being readied for liftoff on 21 August 2018. Martin discusses some of the challenges they have encountered developing this state-of-the-art satellite mission. Aeolus uses powerful laser technology that probes the lowermost 30 km of our atmosphere to yield vertical profiles of the wind and information on aerosols and clouds – a completely new approach to measuring the wind from space.

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