Horizons mission – exercise in space

We all know the importance of exercise, but in space it is even more important to keep astronauts alive and healthy. ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst explains how crew members on the International Space Station exercise for 2.5 hours a day to maintain muscle and bone strength.

From the Cycle Ergometer with Vibration Isolation and Stabilisation (CEVIS), to the Treadmill 2 (T2) and Advanced Resistive Exercise Device (ARED), Alexander shows how the exercise equipment astronauts use in space is similar to what you might find in a gym on Earth – with a few important changes for microgravity.

Alexander took over as commander of the International Space Station for Expedition 57 on 3 October 2018 and will remain on the Station until December 2018 as part of his Horizons mission.

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ESA is Europe’s gateway to space. Our mission is to shape the development of Europe’s space capability and ensure that investment in space continues to deliver benefits to the citizens of Europe and the world. Check out http://www.esa.int/ESA to get up to speed on everything space related.

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Beyond Mission | Presentation event

A video recap of an event held at ESA’s ESRIN establishment in Italy, where ESA astronaut Luca Parmitano revealed the mission name and patch for his 2019 mission to the International Space Station.

The name Beyond was inspired by his fellow ESA astronauts. From the nearness to Earth of Thomas Pesquet’s mission, to the broadening scope of Alexander Gerst’s Horizons mission, Luca saw a path that push humanity even further for the benefit of all.

Learn more about #Beyond and Luca Parmitano: http://lucaparmitano.esa.int

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ESA is Europe’s gateway to space. Our mission is to shape the development of Europe’s space capability and ensure that investment in space continues to deliver benefits to the citizens of Europe and the world. Check out http://www.esa.int/ESA to get up to speed on everything space related.

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Beyond | Luca Parmitano’s 2019 mission to the ISS

ESA astronaut Luca Parmitano’s second International Space Station mission name is ‘Beyond’, in this video he explains the name and logo. Luca returns to space in 2019 as part of Expedition 60/61, alongside Andrew Morgan of NASA and Alexander Skvortsov of Roscosmos.

In selecting Beyond, Luca was inspired by his fellow ESA astronauts. From the nearness to Earth of Thomas Pesquet’s Proxima mission to the broadening scope of Alexander Gerst’s current Horizons mission, Luca saw a path that will push humanity even farther, for the benefit of all.

“What we do in orbit is not for the astronauts or for the International Space Station programme, it is for everybody,” Luca explains. “It is for Earth, it is for humanity, and it is the only path for us to learn what we need in terms of science and technology in order to go beyond.”

The mission logo illustrates this trajectory. An astronaut looks out into space. The Earth and the orbiting Space Station are reflected in the helmet’s visor. In the distance is the Moon poised for humanity’s return, with the Orion spacecraft and exploratory rovers. Beyond is the Red Planet, currently being studied by satellites like ExoMars and Mars Express and one day by humans.

The research Luca will be conducting on the Space Station will contribute to keeping humans safe on longer exploratory missions. Also on the agenda for Luca are demonstrations that will develop the technological and operational knowledge that will allow humans, together with robots, to explore lunar and martian surfaces from orbit and on the surface.

Learn more about #Beyond and Luca Parmitano: http://lucaparmitano.esa.int

Watch the Italian version of this video: https://youtu.be/1DHXWfejJRM

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ESA is Europe’s gateway to space. Our mission is to shape the development of Europe’s space capability and ensure that investment in space continues to deliver benefits to the citizens of Europe and the world. Check out http://www.esa.int/ESA to get up to speed on everything space related.

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ESA’s newest astronaut: Matthias Maurer

German citizen, Matthias Maurer, officially graduated as an ESA astronaut on Tuesday 25 September 2018 at the European Astronaut Centre in Cologne, Germany. Having completed basic and pre-assignment training, he is now qualified to go to space.

From in the classroom to underwater, across Europe, China and beyond, this clip showcases a few highlights from a challenging and rewarding three-year programme.

Send your congratulatory messages to Matthias in the comment section below.

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ESA is Europe’s gateway to space. Our mission is to shape the development of Europe’s space capability and ensure that investment in space continues to deliver benefits to the citizens of Europe and the world. Check out http://www.esa.int/ESA to get up to speed on everything space related.

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Horizons science – robotics

Flying at 28 800 km/h, 400 km above Earth, from the International Space Station, ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst controlled a robot called Justin on 17 August 2018. Justin was stationed at the DLR German Aerospace Center in Oberpfaffenhofen, Germany.
ESA has run multiple experiments from the Space Station with robots to test the network, the control system and the robots on Earth. This is a new area for everybody involved and each aspect needs to be tested. This is the third in a series of SUPVIS-Justin orbital experiments. The first was carried out by ESA astronaut Paolo Nespoli in August 2017.

The SUPVIS-Justin experiment took around four hours in total. This included set-up, software updates and two hours of interaction between Alexander and Justin.

The tests were chosen to enact future scenarios in which astronauts orbiting distant planets and moons can instruct robots to do difficult or dangerous tasks and set up base before landing for further exploration. The experiment fits in ESA’s strategy to prepare for further exploration of our Universe.

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ESA is Europe’s gateway to space. Our mission is to shape the development of Europe’s space capability and ensure that investment in space continues to deliver benefits to the citizens of Europe and the world. Check out http://www.esa.int/ESA to get up to speed on everything space related.

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Horizons mission time-lapse – from Alaska to the Andes

Ever wondered what it feels like to fly from Alaska to the Andes in 260 seconds? ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst captured this timelapse footage of Alaska, the USA and South America while orbiting Earth on board the International Space Station.

This timelapse is made up of 6,375 images shown 12.5 times faster than actual speed. Music is Our Oasis by Miriam Speyer, sourced from Audio Network Limited.

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Horizons mission time-lapse – Australia and New Zealand

Māori, as native New Zealanders, refer to their islands as “Aotearoa” or “the land of the long white cloud”. This timelapse from ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst shows Australia and New Zealand shrouded in cloud from the unique viewpoint of the International Space Station.

Comprised of 5,175 photos, this timelapse is 12.5 times faster than actual speed and is set to the soundtrack “Try or Die” sourced from Audio Network Limited.

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Horizons mission time-lapse – an orbital sunrise

Orbiting Earth once every 90 minutes, the International Space Station soars into 16 sunrises and sunsets every single day. Many of these sunrises occur while the crew is working or sleeping, but ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst captured this stunning timelapse of a sunrise to share with us here on Earth.

These photos were taken by Alexander at an interval of two per second and the video has been edited at 25 frames per second.

Music: First Survivors 4 by Los Angeles-based British composer, Luke Richards. Sourced from Audio Network Limited.

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Horizons science – airway monitoring

In space, there is no such thing as waiting for the dust to settle. Rather than drifting to the ground, dust particles float about continuously and can irritate eyes and lungs.

By recording how much nitrogen oxide he exhales in space as part of the Airway Monitoring experiment, ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst is helping researchers understand how to monitor, diagnose and treat lung conditions like asthma here on Earth.

The findings of this monitoring will also be crucial to exploring the Moon and even Mars – where dust is considered even more toxic and must be carefully managed for astronauts’ health.

The Airways Monitoring experiment has been underway since 2015. Later in the Horizons mission Alexander will repeat the experiment in the reduced pressure of the airlock.

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Good evening, Kraftwerk / Guten Abend Kraftwerk, guten Abend Stuttgart!

On 20 July 2018 around 21:50 local time, ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst welcomed the legendary electronic band Kraftwerk and 7500 visitors to the Jazz Open Festival on Stuttgart’s Schlossplatz – live from the International Space Station, where he will live and work until mid-December 2018. During the call with space, Kraftwerk founding member Ralf Hütter and Alexander played a special duet version of the track Spacelab, for which Alexander had a tablet computer configured with virtual synthesizers on board. With thanks to Kraftwerk for sharing this video footage.

Copyright: Kraftwerk/ESA/JazzOpen – Sitara Schmitz

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So begrüßte ESA-Astronaut Alexander Gerst am 20. Juli 2018 um 21:50 Uhr Ortszeit die legendären Elektro-Pioniere Kraftwerk sowie 7500 Besucherinnen und Besucher des Jazz Open-Festivals auf dem Stuttgarter Schlossplatz – und zwar live von der Internationalen Raumstation ISS, auf der er noch bis Mitte Dezember 2018 lebt und arbeitet.

Kraftwerk-Gründungsmitglied Ralf Hütter und Alexander Gerst spielten eine spezielle Version des Tracks Spacelab im Duett an, für das Gerst eigens einen mit virtuellen Synthesizern konfigurierten Tablet-Computer an Bord hatte.