ESA Euronews: Studying climate threats with Sentinel

The most recent trends in sea level size mean the low-lying Camargue region of southern France could be submerged by the sea by the end of the century.

The sea walls built along the coast in the 1980s have already been broken by the waves, as a combination of rising waters, slowly sinking landmass, and reduced amounts of sediment from the Rhone river spell trouble for this environment.

Anis Guelmami uses Copernicus Sentinel satellites to study wetlands like the Camargue, and he tells us the latest news from space.

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Paxi – The Greenhouse effect

Join Paxi as he explores the greenhouse effect to learn about global warming.

In this video, targeted at children aged between 6 and 12, Paxi explains the greenhouse effect and what we can do to help.

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Paxi – Broeikaseffect

Sluit je aan bij Paxi terwijl hij het broeikaseffect verkent om meer te weten te komen over het broeikaseffect.

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Glaciers in decline

Apart from Antarctica, Patagonia is home to the biggest glaciers in the southern hemisphere, but some are retreating faster than anywhere else in the world. This is because the weather is relatively warm and these glaciers typically terminate in fjords and lakes, exacerbating surface melting and causing them to flow faster and lose ice as icebergs at their margins. Traditionally, it has been very difficult to map exactly how fast these glaciers are changing. However, a new way of processing ESA CryoSat swath data now makes it possible to map these glaciers in fine detail. CryoSat has revealed that between 2011 and 2017, there was widespread thinning, particularly in Patagonia’s more northern ice fields. The Jorge Montt glacier, which flows down to the ocean, retreated 2.5 km and lost about 2.2 Gt a year. In contrast, Pio XI, the largest glacier in South America, advanced and gained mass at a rate of about 0.67 Gt a year. However, over the six-year period, the glaciers overall lost mass at a rate of over 21 Gt a year. This loss is adding about 0.06 mm a year to sea level.

© Planetary Visions (credit: ESA/Planetary Visions)

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Learn more: http://bit.ly/CryosatRevealsRetreatOfPatagoniaGlaciers

Related Posts / Articles Similaires

Glaciers in decline

Apart from Antarctica, Patagonia is home to the biggest glaciers in the southern hemisphere, but some are retreating faster than anywhere else in the world. This is because the weather is relatively warm and these glaciers typically terminate in fjords and lakes, exacerbating surface melting and causing them to flow faster and lose ice as icebergs at their margins. Traditionally, it has been very difficult to map exactly how fast these glaciers are changing. However, a new way of processing ESA CryoSat swath data now makes it possible to map these glaciers in fine detail. CryoSat has revealed that between 2011 and 2017, there was widespread thinning, particularly in Patagonia’s more northern ice fields. The Jorge Montt glacier, which flows down to the ocean, retreated 2.5 km and lost about 2.2 Gt a year. In contrast, Pio XI, the largest glacier in South America, advanced and gained mass at a rate of about 0.67 Gt a year. However, over the six-year period, the glaciers overall lost mass at a rate of over 21 Gt a year. This loss is adding about 0.06 mm a year to sea level.

© Planetary Visions (credit: ESA/Planetary Visions)

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Learn more: http://bit.ly/CryosatRevealsRetreatOfPatagoniaGlaciers

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