Nachricht an meine Enkelkinder [with Closed Captions]

CLOSED CAPTIONS IN ENGLISH AVAILABLE

ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst recorded a message in German to his future grandchildren from the International Space Station’s Cupola observatory during his Horizons mission in 2018. Although this message is addressed to his descendants, it applies to all of us. Everyone should contribute to the protection and improvement of this planet we call home.

Alexander’s message is as follows:

Dear grandchildren,

You have not been born yet, and I do not know if I will ever meet you, so I’ve decided to record this message for you.

I’m on the International Space Station in the Cupola Observation Module gazing down at your beautiful planet. And although I’ve now almost spent a year of my life in space and looked at Earth every single day, I just can’t get enough of this view.

I know it probably sounds strange to you, but at the time the Space Station was built and was up here in orbit, not everyone was able to travel into space and see the Earth from a distance. Before me, only around 500 people had the chance. At this very moment, there are 7 billion people living down there on Earth and only three of them live in space. And when I look down at the planet, I think I need to apologise to you.

Right now, it looks like we – my generation – are not going to leave this planet in its best condition for you. Of course, in retrospect many people will say they weren’t aware of what we were doing. But in reality, we humans know that right now we’re polluting the planet with carbon dioxide, we’re making the climate reach tipping point, we’re clearing forests, we’re polluting the oceans with garbage, we’re consuming the limited resources far too quickly, and we’re waging mostly pointless wars.

And every one of us has to take a good look at themselves and think about where this is leading. I very much hope for our own sake that we can still get our act together and improve a few things. And I hope that we won’t be remembered by you as the generation who selfishly and ruthlessly destroyed your livelihood.

I’m sure you understand these things much better than my generation. And who knows, maybe we’ll learn something new, such as: taking a step always helps; this fragile spaceship called Earth is much smaller than most people can imagine; how fragile the Earth’s biosphere is and how limited its resources are; that it’s worth getting along with your neighbours; that dreams are more valuable than money and you have to give them a chance; that boys and girls can do things equally well, but that every one of you has one thing that he or she can do much better than all the others; that the simple explanations are often wrong and that one’s own point of view is always incomplete; that the future is more important than the past; that one should never fully grow up; and that opportunities only come along once. You have to take a risk for things that are worth it, and any day during which you discovered something new – one where you gazed beyond your horizon – is a good day.

I wish I could look into the future through your eyes, into your world and how you see it. Unfortunately, that is not possible and therefore the only thing that remains for me is to try to make your future the best one I can possibly imagine.

International Space Station – Commander of Expedition 57 – Alexander Gerst – 25 November 2018 – 400 km above the Earth’s surface
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Follow Alexander and review his #Horizons mission on social media via http://bit.ly/AlexanderGerstESA and on http://bit.ly/HorizonsBlogESA
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ESA is Europe’s gateway to space. Our mission is to shape the development of Europe’s space capability and ensure that investment in space continues to deliver benefits to the citizens of Europe and the world. Check out http://www.esa.int/ESA to get up to speed on everything space related.

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Hallo Berlin!

From onboard the International Space Station, ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst talks with Angela Merkel, Chancellor of the Federal Republic of Germany, in context of the award ceremony of the ‘Jugend forscht’ (‘Youth researches’) science contest, held in Berlin on 6 September 2018.

Credits: Bundesregierung

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Follow ESA on Twitter: http://bit.ly/ESAonTwitter
On Facebook: http://bit.ly/ESAonFacebook
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ESA is Europe’s gateway to space. Our mission is to shape the development of Europe’s space capability and ensure that investment in space continues to deliver benefits to the citizens of Europe and the world. Check out http://www.esa.int/ESA to get up to speed on everything space related.

Copyright information about our videos is available here: http://www.esa.int/spaceinvideos/Terms_and_Conditions

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Horizons mission – First call from space

ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst spoke to European media from the International Space Station on 12 June 2018, just three days after docking with the orbiting outpost.

The press conference was held at the European Astronaut Centre in Cologne, Germany, and was mainly in German.

Alexander answered questions on climate, how it feel to be in space a second time, and the football World Cup.

This is Alexander’s second six-month stay on the International Space Station. The mission is called Horizons as a symbol for the unknown and what lies beyond. The mission further cements ESA’s know-how for living and working off-planet. Alexander will be testing ways of operating and working with robots to develop techniques required for further human and robotic exploration of our Solar System such as commanding rovers while orbiting another planet.

The Horizons science programme is packed with European research: Alexander will take part in over 50 experiments to deliver benefits to people on Earth as well as prepare for future space exploration. Many of these experiments will take place in Europe’s Columbus laboratory that is celebrating its 10th anniversary in space this year.

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Follow Alexander and the Horizons mission on social media via http://bit.ly/AlexanderGerstESA and on http://bit.ly/HorizonsBlogESA.

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Horizons News Conference – 17 April 2018

ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst’s last news conference in Europe before his second launch into space. The event was presented in German and English.

The mission is called Horizons to evoke exploring our Universe, looking further than our planet and broadening our knowledge.
Alex will be launched in June with US astronaut Serena Auñón-Chancellor and Russian cosmonaut Sergei Prokopyev from the Baikonur cosmodrome, Kazakhstan, in the Soyuz MS-09 spacecraft.

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Learn more about:

Horizons: http://bit.ly/HorizonsOverview

Electromagnetic levitator: http://bit.ly/ElectroMagneticLevitator

Live cell imaging: http://bit.ly/LiveCellImagingHorizons

CIMON: http://bit.ly/CIMONAirbus

Testing astronauts lungs: http://bit.ly/TestingAstronautsLungsInSpaceStation

Astro-Pi Challenge: http://bit.ly/AstroPiChallenge2017

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